Is There A Doomsday Clock

Is There A Doomsday Clock
Is There A Doomsday Clock Image link: https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/blog/tag/asteroids/
C O N T E N T S:

KEY TOPICS

  • Scientists cited growing nuclear threats, climate change and a lack of trust in political institutions as they set the doomsday clock at two minutes to midnight — 30 seconds closer than it was last year.(More…)
  • Since the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists sent out a press release yesterday, the New York Times, the BBC, the Washington Post, and countless other outlets have reported that the Doomsday Clock now reads just 2 minutes to midnight, the closest we?ve been to nuclear apocalypse since the Cold War.(More…)
  • If the Doomsday Clock’s proponents want to be helpful, they should focus more on the dangers of conventional conflict on the Korean Peninsula and less on North Korea possessing nuclear weapons, which at this point is largely a fait accompli.(More…)
  • In 1960, the clock was moved 5 minutes away (to seven minutes to midnight) from Doomsday because the “Pugwash conferences” were established, meetings where self-selected scientists from various nuclear countries sit down and congratulate each other on how farsighted and concerned they are.(More…)

POSSIBLY USEFUL

  • The clock represents the hypothetical global catastrophe as “midnight” and The Bulletin ‘ s opinion on how close the world is to a global catastrophe as a number of “minutes” to midnight.(More…)
  • According to the organization?s website, the Bulletin purposefully developed the Clock using apocalyptic imagery of “midnight” and the countdown to zero to demonstrate nuclear explosion in order to “convey threats to humanity and the planet.”(More…)
  • At two minutes to midnight, the clock is at its closest to catastrophe since 1953, due to dangers of a nuclear holocaust from North Korea’s weapons program, U.S. Russian entanglements, South China Sea tensions, and other factors, the Chicago-based group said in a statement.(More…)

RANKED SELECTED SOURCES

KEY TOPICS

Scientists cited growing nuclear threats, climate change and a lack of trust in political institutions as they set the doomsday clock at two minutes to midnight — 30 seconds closer than it was last year. [1] Editor?s note: Founded in 1945 by University of Chicago scientists who had helped develop the first atomic weapons in the Manhattan Project, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists created the Doomsday Clock two years later, using the imagery of apocalypse (midnight) and the contemporary idiom of nuclear explosion (countdown to zero) to convey threats to humanity and the planet. [2] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Science and Security Board believes the perilous world security situation just described would, in itself, justify moving the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock closer to midnight. [2] “Because of the extraordinary danger of the current moment, the Science and Security Board today moves the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock 30 seconds closer to catastrophe,” said Rachel Bronson, president of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. [3]

“Last year, the Science and Security Board moved the Doomsday Clock forward to three minutes to midnight, noting: ‘The probability of global catastrophe is very high, and the actions needed to reduce the risks of disaster must be taken very soon.’ That probability has not been reduced. [4] For the last two years, the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock stayed set at three minutes before the hour, the closest it had been to midnight since the early 1980s. [4] The two tied-for-lowest points for the Doomsday Clock have been in 1953, when the clock was set to two minutes until midnight after the U.S. and the Soviet Union began testing hydrogen bombs, and in 2018, following the failure of world leaders to address tensions relating to nuclear weapons and climate change issues. [5] Scientists moved the hands of the Doomsday Clock closer to midnight on Thursday amid increasing worries over nuclear weapons and climate change. [3] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists moved the doomsday clock closer to midnight on Thursday morning, warning the world that it is as close to catastrophe in 2018 as it has ever been. [1] The Doomsday Clock, a potent symbol of scientific concerns about humanity?s possible annihilation, was advanced by 30 seconds on Thursday, to 2 minutes to midnight, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced in Washington. [6]

The Doomsday Clock was moved on Thursday to two minutes to midnight – marking the closest the symbolic point of global Armageddon. [7] It is two minutes to midnight, but the Doomsday Clock has ticked away from midnight in the past, and during the next year, the world can again move it further from apocalypse. [2] The decision to move (or to leave in place) the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock is made every year by the Bulletin?s Science and Security Board in consultation with its Board of Sponsors, which includes 15 Nobel laureates. [2]

The statement explaining the resetting of the time of the Doomsday Clock notes: “In 2017, world leaders failed to respond effectively to the looming threats of nuclear war and climate change, making the world security situation more dangerous than it was a year ago — and as dangerous as it has been since World War II. [3] Many of the world’s most renowned scientists will host a ceremony to announce the time on the Doomsday Clock – an expression of just how much danger humanity is in. [7] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists advanced the storied Doomsday Clock a notch closer to the end of humanity during its annual announcement Thursday. [7] The Bulletin ?s signature strength is its capacity to synthesize and inform by linking critical issues, treaty negotiations, and scientific assessments to threats represented by the iconic Doomsday Clock. [2] ” Seven Minutes to Midnight “, a 1980 single by Wah! Heat refers to that year’s change of the Doomsday Clock from 9 to 7 minutes to midnight. [5] The Doomsday Clock, a potent symbol of scientific concerns about humanity?s possible annihilation, was advanced by 30 seconds on Thursday, to 2 minutes to midnight. [7] “The people behind the Doomsday Clock explain why we’re so close to midnight”. [5] Information about the Doomsday Clock Symposium, 10 a timeline of the clock’s settings, 5 and multimedia shows about the clock’s history and culture 11 can also be found on The Bulletin ‘ s website. [5] “Today?s Doomsday Clock announcement must serve as an urgent wake-up call — and could be the last one we get,” said Derek Johnson, the executive director of Global Zero, a group that wants to eliminate nuclear weapons. [3] In the 2017 Criminal Minds episode ” The Bunker “, the UnSub abducts women based on the Doomsday Clock to “save” them from a “global catastrophe” he believes will take place. [5] The 5th Doomsday Clock Symposium 10 was held on November 14, 2013, in Washington, D.C.; it was a day-long event that was open to the public and featured panelists discussing various issues on the topic “Communicating Catastrophe”. [5] We do this through our award-winning journal, iconic Doomsday Clock, public-access website, and regular set of convenings. [2] Beatrice Fihn, executive director of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, which was awarded the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize for its work on a treaty that was completed last July, said the advance of the Doomsday Clock was “obviously deeply concerning and worrying and reflects where we are today.” [6] It is urgent that, collectively, we put in the work necessary to produce a 2019 Clock statement that rewinds the Doomsday Clock. [2] “The Doomsday Clock is now just 2 minutes to ‘midnight,’ the symbolic hour of the apocalypse”. [5]

Scientists blamed a cocktail of threats ranging from dangerous political rhetoric to the potential of a nuclear threat as the catalysts for moving the clock closer toward doomsday. [3] It is now two minutes to midnight–the closest the Clock has ever been to Doomsday, and as close as it was in 1953, at the height of the Cold War. [2] The closest nuclear war threat, the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, reached crisis, climax, and resolution before the clock could be set to reflect that possible doomsday. [5]

Scientists moved the hands of the symbolic “Doomsday Clock” closer to midnight on Thursday amid increasing worries over nuclear weapons and climate change. [3] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has moved its “Doomsday Clock” ahead by 30 seconds. [3] Members of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists deliver remarks on the 2017 time for the “Doomsday Clock” on Jan. 26, 2017 in Washington, DC. [1] That existential fear was affirmed today by the organization of nuclear scientists who have spent seven decades trying to turn humanity away from nuclear weapons: The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists moved its Doomsday Clock 30 seconds closer to “midnight,” an unofficial barometer of how close the world stands to a man-made catastrophe. [8] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced that the infamous, symbolic ” Doomsday Clock ” had moved 30 seconds closer to midnight. [9]

On January 22, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced that the Doomsday Clock had moved forward to two minutes to midnight. [10] Physicists Lawrence Krauss and Robert Rosner of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists move the Doomsday Clock to two minutes to midnight. [11] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced today that it has moved its Doomsday Clock to 2 minutes before midnight, citing North Korea?s recent tests of missiles and nuclear weapons and the world?s lack of progress in confronting climate change. [12] Video: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory The Doomsday Clock is now two minutes to midnight, as close as it?s ever been to the hour standing in for the apocalypse because of threats posed by nuclear weapons, climate change, and fake news. [11] As of Thursday January 25, 2018, the time on The Doomsday Clock stands at two minutes to midnight, 30 seconds closer to armageddon than its previous setting of two and a half minutes to in January 2017. [13] That was the dire warning Thursday from the atomic scientists who run the metaphorical Doomsday Clock — and who have moved the hands 30 seconds closer to midnight, which represents the moment the world could be annihilated by nuclear war. [14] In another stellar win for the Trump administration, today the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists pushed the Doomsday Clock forward to 2 minutes from midnight. [15] The Bulletin has been updating its Doomsday Clock periodically since 1947, its hour-hand stuck reliably on eleven and its minute-hand moving closer to or farther away from midnight, depending on how screwed up the world is. [9] As the so-called Doomsday Clock ticks even closer to midnight, a reminder that war is the default setting. [8] The Doomsday Clock — a metaphorical measure of how close the world is to annihilation — “is as close as it?s ever been” to end-of-days midnight, scientists announced Thursday as the clock advanced from 11:57:30 p.m. to 11:58 p.m. [16] “In fact, the Doomsday Clock is as close to midnight today as it was in 1953, when Cold War fears perhaps reached their highest levels.” [14] The Doomsday Clock just ticked 30 seconds, bringing us at an uncomfy two-minutes-to-midnight for the first time since the Cold War. [17] Maybe the Doomsday Clock was a more apt metaphor during the Cold War–an era of hair-triggers, false alarms, and automatic missile launch systems, when Europe was, in a very real sense, minutes away from annihilation at all times. [13] Boris Yeltsin–back when the Doomsday Clock stood at a remarkably peaceful 14 minutes to midnight–was actually handed the Russian nuclear briefcase, known as the Cheget, in 1995 when Russian radar mistook the launch of a Norwegian scientific rocket for a surprise attack from a U.S. submarine. [8] Scientists Lawrence Krauss (left) and Robert Rosner (middle) and international affairs expert Sharon Squassoni (right) unveiled an updated Doomsday Clock, which the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has updated yearly since creating it in 1947. [12] A Doomsday Clock report by the Bulletin scientists suggests ways world leaders can step back from the brink, starting with Trump ignoring Kim Jong-un?s provocative rhetoric. [12] The venerable bulletin must continue its mission–but it should call time on the Doomsday Clock. [13] It would simply be remiss to accuse the bulletin of scaremongering, but the Doomsday Clock is an increasingly inadequate tool for raising public and political awareness of the most pressing global challenges. [13] The Doomsday Clock was initially devised in 1947 as a measurement of the world’s proximity to nuclear Armageddon. [16] In 2007, the Doomsday Clock started to factor in worries besides nuclear war: climate change is the big one, but the Bulletin’s board members also consider bioweapons, rogue AIs, and cyberwarfare. [10] “Whenever Doomsday Clock time rolls around, I roll my eyes because the Clock doesn?t actually gauge anything measurable,” journalist Michael Lemonick wrote in 2016. [11] He looks at the doomsday clock as a kind of modern-day memento mori — a compelling, easily understood reminder that time is limited, he says. [11] The Doomsday Clock doesn’t tick constantly, but instead moves in response to periodic deliberations on the state of humanity. [17] It’s important to keep in mind that the Doomsday Clock doesn’t move in response to specific events. [10] The Doomsday Clock, however well intentioned its custodians, undermines the bulletin’s stated mission to put “issues and events into context”. [13] Along with reliably freaking people out, the Doomsday Clock has also turned the imminent catastrophic destruction of our only planet into a fun annual news event. [9] Since it began in 1947, the Doomsday Clock has become the best-known measure of humanity?s risk of global catastrophe. [15]

In January 2018, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists moved the Doomsday Clock forward 30 seconds, to two minutes to midnight. [18] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists on Thursday moved the Doomsday Clock to two minutes to midnight, the point of global annihilation. [19] The Doomsday Clock is now two minutes to midnight, which is as close as it has ever been to armageddon, or so says the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. [20] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists announced they have moved the Doomsday Clock forward so it now rests 2 minutes before midnight. [21] Doomsday Clock Moves Closer To Midnight, We’re 2 Minutes From World Annihilation : The Two-Way Scientists who assess threats each year and express their concerns using the clock are worried about President Trump’s unpredictability and governments’ failure to trust each other. [22] A panel of scientists and policy experts moved their Doomsday Clock 30 seconds closer to midnight on Thursday, citing President Trump’s rhetoric on nuclear weapons, environmental deterioration due to climate change and a lack of trust in political institutions. [22] The last time the Doomsday Clock was set at two minutes to midnight followed U.S. and Soviet test detonations of thermonuclear (or hydrogen) bombs in 1953. [18] Earth’s precarious future is measured in minutes on the hypothetical Doomsday Clock, and its hands are currently creeping perilously close to midnight. [23] The catastrophic nature of 2017 and — let?s just say it — President Donald Trump?s mouth and Twitter fingers have propelled the Doomsday Clock to two minutes to midnight as of January 25. [24] Moving the Doomsday Clock closer to midnight only serves to ratchet up the fear among ordinary Americans that a nuclear exchange is something about which they should be deeply concerned and scared. [20] Bulletin of Atomic Scientists For the 2018 time shift, members of the Doomsday Clock panel squarely took aim at the rhetoric and actions of President Donald Trump, who has said he is pushing for a nuclear arms race. [18] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has officially sped up the world?s Doomsday Clock, citing world leaders? failure to deal with threats of nuclear war. [25] The threats posed by climate change make the Doomsday Clock tick since 2007, when the Bulletin described them as “nearly as dire” as the threat of nuclear weapons. [26] Though 70 years have passed since the Doomsday Clock debuted, global threats to human survival from nuclear weapons and climate change still loom large. [23]

In the year since the hands on the Doomsday Clock were last adjusted, North Korea has carried out its sixth nuclear test, the most powerful to date and almost certainly its first hydrogen bomb. [27] Since Trump has spoken recklessly about both climate change and nuclear arms, the SASB uses the Doomsday Clock as a way to come out and say that his rhetoric is harmful and threatening to our country and beyond. [24] Ever since 1998, when India and Pakistan started testing nuclear weapons, the Doomsday Clock has been just single digits away from midnight. [21] The Doomsday Clock is a symbol that was created at the beginning of the Cold War in 1947 to represent the threat of nuclear weapons, which, the Bulletin says have the potential to destroy civilization as we know it. [25] The Bulletin offered several steps to wind back the Doomsday Clock, including nuclear negotiations between the United States and Russia, engagement with North Korea by a host of nations and greater efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. [19] “A security based on luck is reckless and foolish; it’s exactly what the nuclear states have now. 122 nations voted for the nuclear ban Treaty and other nations need to join the process so we can stop flirting with our own destruction and destroy the Doomsday Clock once and for all,” she said in a statement. [19] This group also serves as the Bulletin?s editorial board and is responsible for setting the hands of the Doomsday Clock and issuing supporting statements when its time changes. [24] Members of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists take their seats after moving their Doomsday clock 30 seconds closer to the end of the world January 25, 2018 in Washington, DC. [19] Fox News asked Rachel Bronson, the president and CEO of the Bulletin, to explain what the Doomsday Clock is, and why it has been creeping closer to midnight during the past decade. [25] The Doomsday Clock experts are also gravely concerned about the state of the warming planet, the resulting climate change, and a fractured global effort to confront and mitigate its worst threats by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. [18] The Doomsday Clock, started during the Cold War, symbolizes the threat to global civilization posed by humans. [18] The Doomsday Clock, which has been updated continuously since 1947, has long been a backdrop to the nuclear era and a means for raising awareness about the threat of nuclear war. [20] The world is now just two minutes away from an “apocalypse” – at least, that’s what the Doomsday Clock is saying. [25] “It is urgent that, collectively, we put in the work necessary to produce a 2019 Clock statement that rewinds the Doomsday Clock,” the Bulletin said in a statement. [25] The ongoing changes to the Doomsday Clock not only serve as a warning about a dire situation but are also a call to action to shape a safer and more sustainable path for us all, Kennette Benedict, a senior adviser to the BAS, said in a statement. [23] What is the Doomsday Clock? It?s more of a symbol than a prophecy, so there?s no need to prepare for nuclear fallout just yet. [24] Even for a symbolic exercise like the Doomsday Clock, the return to a time of fear as dire as the Cold War is unsettling. [26] Since 2015, the Doomsday Clock has undergone annual updates, but that wasn’t always the case. [23] The number of Doomsday Clock updates rose again during the 1980s, reflecting renewed deterioration of U.S. and Soviet relations. [23] The point of the Doomsday Clock is to encourage leaders and individuals to confront the dire importance of these complex issues and to encourage conversations that will ultimately lead to solutions — and to a safer world for us all, Rachel Bronson, BAS president and CEO, told reporters today. [23] The Doomsday Clock is a symbol which represents the likelihood of a human-made global catastrophe. [21]

It stayed there for the next seven years, according to the Bulletin. (In the case that the Clock does strike midnight, Time created a list of Doomsday bunkers to meet every budget.) [24] It’s the closest the clock has been to doomsday in 65 years, at the height of the Cold War, according to the Bulletin. [25] The Clock is now closer than it has ever been to Doomsday since the height of the Cold War in 1953. [21]

For the second year in a row, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists has moved the symbolic “Doomsday Clock” thirty seconds closer to midnight. [26] A group of eminent scientists behind the “Doomsday Clock” symbolically moved its time forward another 30 seconds on Thursday, marking an alarming one-minute advancement since 2016. [18] There was no change in 2016, but 2017 saw the Doomsday Clock’s hands sweeping forward 30 seconds, bringing the time to 2 minutes and 30 seconds before midnight. [23] The “Doomsday Clock,” a hypothetical timepiece that measures humanity’s proximity to destruction by our own actions, hovers perilously close to midnight, the time that denotes global Armageddon. [23] In the process, it is potentially increasing the chances of war, which is a strange way to move the world away from the Doomsday Clock’s proverbial midnight. [20]

Since the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists sent out a press release yesterday, the New York Times, the BBC, the Washington Post, and countless other outlets have reported that the Doomsday Clock now reads just 2 minutes to midnight, the closest we?ve been to nuclear apocalypse since the Cold War. [28] Citing growing nuclear risks and unchecked climate dangers, the Doomsday Clock has been moved to two minutes before midnight–its closest point symbolically to total catastrophe since the height of the Cold War. [29]

BREAKING: Doomsday Clock signalling how close Earth is to destruction has been set at two minutes to midnight, the most dire reading since 1953. [30] “Invented by former members of the Manhattan Project, the so-called Doomsday Clock isn’t really a clock at all, but rather a handy way to visualize the aggregate effects of various threats to humanity: The closer the metaphorical minute hand is to midnight, the closer we are to total destruction. [31] In January 2017, the Doomsday Clock edged forward 30 seconds, to two and half minutes before midnight. [29] Hear ye, hear ye: the Doomsday Clock, the strange metaphorical timepiece we only look at once per year, has just been moved 30 seconds closer to midnight. [31] The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, which is located at the Harris School of Public Policy and whose board includes a number of UChicago scientists, announced during a Jan. 25 event in Washington, D.C. that the Doomsday Clock would move ahead 30 seconds. [29] Since 1947, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has been setting and publishing the time on its metaphorical Doomsday Clock. [32] Every year, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists updates the Doomsday Clock. [31] In 1947, the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists (BAS) was first published along with a Doomsday Clock. [33]

By 1988, the BAS was a little less gloomy, moving the doomsday clock 3 minutes away from the end of the world largely because of the historic 1967 INF treaty between the United States and the Soviet Union. [33] The symbolic Doomsday Clock, which represents how close humanity is to destroying the planet, is the nearest it has been to signalling the end of the world since 1953. [34] The Doomsday Clock has indicated how close humanity is to self-destruction since 1947. [34]

That?s exactly the problem: A literal Doomsday Clock that?s perennially poised to signal the end of humanity, while a powerful metaphor, so far hasn?t been a useful tool for change. [28] These weapons were reduced unilaterally and not by treaty both during and after the end of the Cold War, but did not factor into the doomsday clock moves until after the end of the Cold War. [33] When the Doomsday Clock was first “set” in 1947, during the Cold War, we were at 11:53. [35] The Doomsday clock was moved toward Armageddon in 2002 by 2 minutes because, as the BAS then wrote, the “U.S. rejects arms control treaties” and had unwisely gotten out of the ABM treaty. [33] “One of our main motivations in even having the Doomsday Clock and going through the trouble of setting it every year is to motivate people to be concerned, to learn about these issues, and to make their views and concerns known to their governments,” Somerville told Al Jazeera. [34] “It is with considerable concern that we set the Doomsday Clock, as of today,” Rachel Bronson, president and CEO of the organization, said during a news conference. [30] If you haven’t heard of the Doomsday Clock, here’s a brief and terrifying synopsis for you: It was created in 1947 at the University of Chicago as an easy analogy to show people how close we are to armageddon at any given moment. [35]

If the Doomsday Clock’s proponents want to be helpful, they should focus more on the dangers of conventional conflict on the Korean Peninsula and less on North Korea possessing nuclear weapons, which at this point is largely a fait accompli. [20] A timeline of the Doomsday Clock’s setting from 1947 through 2017. [18]

In 1960, the clock was moved 5 minutes away (to seven minutes to midnight) from Doomsday because the “Pugwash conferences” were established, meetings where self-selected scientists from various nuclear countries sit down and congratulate each other on how farsighted and concerned they are. [33] In 1963, understandably, the limited Nuclear Test Ban treaty was the basis of moving the clock another 5 minutes away (to 12 minutes to midnight) from Doomsday. [33] “Midnight” on the clock represents doomsday, and, obviously, the closer the hands are to midnight, the closer we are to total annihilation. [35] In 1974 and 1980 the BAS folks moved the clock closer to Doomsday, perturbed that nuclear deterrence was still an integral part of strategy, likening the arms race to two drunks thinking they could stop drinking by agreeing over and over again to “buy just one more.” [33] In 1969 the clock was again moved away from Doomsday when the U.S. Senate ratified the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. [33] In 1981, again the clock moved another 3 minutes toward Doomsday, claiming that President Reagan was totally opposed to arms control. [33] By 1991, with the signing of the START I treaty and the reduction of deployed strategic nuclear weapons by 6000 (close to a 50 percent cut), the BAS wrote that thousands of nuclear weapons were removed from “hair trigger alert” and the clock was moved away from Doomsday. [33] In 2018, despite the 2010 New Start treaty that had resulted in cuts to strategic nuclear weapons from 2200 to 1550, the clock ticks 30 seconds closer to Doomsday. [33] The changes away from Doomsday are done for what appear to be frivolous reasons, even as key events such as major arms control agreements are ignored and don?t move the clock at all. [33] When the clock was first conceived in 1947, it was set at 11:53, seven minutes before Doomsday, because, as artist Martyl Langsdorf put it, “It looked good to my eye.” [28] In 1972, the clock was moved again away from Doomsday with the signing of the ABM Treaty and the first SALT agreement. [33] It?s the closest the clock has ever been to doomsday, though it?s been here before, in the 1950s, when the United States and the Soviet Union were both testing thermonuclear devices and destroying islands in the process. [32]

The minute hand on the Doomsday Clock now rests at two minutes to midnight, the closest it?s been since the earliest days of the Cold War. [36] In slightly terrifying news for the day, scientists have moved the Doomsday Clock 30 seconds ahead, making it two minutes to midnight. [37] The Doomsday Clock hasn?t fallen this close to midnight since 1953, a year after the U.S. and Russia tested the hydrogen bomb, a bomb up to 1000 times more powerful than the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. [38] In an op-ed for The Washington Post, Bulletin officials said, “the Doomsday Clock is as close to midnight as it was in 1953, when Cold War fears perhaps reached their highest levels.” [37] The Doomsday Clock is just ticked half a minute closer to midnight. [39] The Doomsday Clock last stood at “two minutes to midnight” in 1953, spurred in part by the “Ivy Mike” thermonuclear test, above. [40] As existentially gloomy as the Doomsday Clock is, it has become an American pop culture phenomenon, inspiring songs such as Midnight Oil?s 1984 song ” Minutes to Midnight,” and the 1997 Smashing Pumpkins? ” Doomsday Clock.” [41] As of 10am this morning, the Doomsday Clock stood at two minutes to midnight. [42] Midnight on the Doomsday Clock refers to the moment of global destruction, so we obviously don’t want to get closer to it — however, that is exactly what’s happening. [37] The bottom line: The Doomsday Clock is as close as it?s ever been to midnight. [42] “It is with considerable concern that we set the time of the Doomsday Clock. as of today, it is two minutes to midnight.” [39] The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists inched their iconic Doomsday Clock forward another thirty seconds. [38] Speaking to reporters, experts from the group said that while the Doomsday Clock is based on the risk of many existential threats–like world war, climate change, major epidemics, or new technologies–there was one that outweighed all others this year. [40] Over the years, the Doomsday Clock pendulum has swung back and forth. [41] The Doomsday Clock is a poignant symbol of the threats facing human civilization, and it received broad media attention this week through British outlets like The Guardian and The Independent, Australian outlets such as ABC Online, and American outlets from Fox News to The New York Times. [38] The Doomsday Clock was conceived in 1947 by a group of University of Chicago physicists who worked on atomic weapons as part of the Manhattan Project. [41] The Doomsday Clock, the historical (some might say hysterical) tracker of how close we are to a human-made catastrophe, has just advanced by 30 seconds. [41] The advancement of the Doomsday Clock is never a good sign, and it certainly means changes need to be made immediately. [37] The Doomsday Clock is not an actual clock ticking down the seconds until humanity as we know it is over, but more of a symbol. [37] The Doomsday Clock ceremony is a subjective–and deeply weird–yearly event. [39] “That in many ways is the power of the Doomsday Clock, in that it gives us a way to talk about whether the world is safer or at greater risk than it was last year. [40]

Two minutes to midnight is the closest to doomsday to the scientists have ever set the clock. [39] The editors of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists convened today, Jan. 25, to move the hand on its “Doomsday Clock” to two minutes to midnight. [43]

POSSIBLY USEFUL

The clock represents the hypothetical global catastrophe as “midnight” and The Bulletin ‘ s opinion on how close the world is to a global catastrophe as a number of “minutes” to midnight. [5] The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, founded by scientists who helped develop the first atomic weapons, has been moving the clock closer to and further from midnight for more than 70 years. [1] Each year, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, a non-profit group that sets the clock, decides whether the events of the previous year pushed humanity closer or farther from destruction. [3]

Maintained since 1947 by the members of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists ‘ Science and Security Board, 1 the clock represents an analogy for the threat of global nuclear war. [5] The Science and Security Board now again moves the hands of the Clock to two minutes before midnight. [2]

The scientists created the clock in 1947 using the imagery of apocalypse (midnight) and the contemporary idiom of nuclear explosion (countdown to zero) to convey threats to humanity and the Earth. [3] The clock was last set at 2 minutes to midnight in 1953, after the Americans and then the Soviets tested thermonuclear weapons for the first time, within 10 months of each other. [6] The clock was first set in 1947 at seven minutes to midnight, serving as a warning about nuclear weapons. [1]

It is two and a half minutes to midnight, the Clock is ticking, global danger looms. [2] The farthest it’s been from midnight was in 1991 as the Cold War ended when the clock was 17 minutes to midnight. [3] “The clock ticks now at just three minutes to midnight because international leaders are failing to perform their most important duty– ensuring and preserving the health and vitality of human civilization.” [2] The last time the clock was moved so close to midnight was in 1953, during the Cold War. [6]

Although the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists focuses on nuclear risk, climate change, and emerging technologies, the nuclear landscape takes center stage in this year?s Clock statement. [2] Along with nuclear proliferation and climate change — which first factored into the setting of the clock in 2007 — the scientists said they were alarmed by the speed of technological change. [6] The clock is adjusted in early 1981. 26 The Soviet war in Afghanistan toughens the U.S. ‘ nuclear posture. [5] “The danger of nuclear conflagration is not the only reason the clock has been moved forward.” [3] “The hands of the Clock of Doom have moved again,” the Bulletin announces. [2] The clock has been maintained by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists since 1947. [3] The symbolic clock is now the closest it’s been to midnight since 1953. [3] This is the furthest from midnight the clock has been since its inception. [5] More important is whether the clock is closer to or farther from midnight. [6] In 1947, during the Cold War, the clock was started at seven minutes to midnight. [5]

The clock is not set and reset in real time as events occur; rather than respond to each and every crisis as it happens, the Science and Security Board meets twice annually to discuss global events in a deliberative manner. [5] The Science and Security Board hopes this resetting of the Clock will be interpreted exactly as it is meant–as an urgent warning of global danger. [2]

The Clock attracts more daily visitors to our site than any other feature, and commands worldwide attention when the Bulletin issues periodic assessments of global threats and solutions. [2] As the Bulletin evolves from a newsletter into a magazine, the Clock appears on the cover for the first time. [4] In January 2007, designer Michael Bierut, who was on The Bulletin ‘ s Governing Board, redesigned the clock to give it a more modern feel. [5] “One of the things about the clock is that it doesn?t change in response to individual events,” Lawrence M. Krauss, a cosmologist at Arizona State University and a member of the board, said in a phone interview on Thursday. [6]

“We are moving the clock forward again by 30 seconds, due to the failure of President Trump and other world leaders to deal with looming threats of nuclear war and climate change,” they wrote. [1] He said the clock “captures, for one day, deep existential threats that for most of the rest of the year aren?t talked about.” [6] “Last year, the Clock ticked forward largely in response to candidate Trump?s alarming campaign rhetoric. [3] The year just past proved perilous and chaotic, a year in which many of the risks foreshadowed in our last Clock statement came into full relief. [2]

The clock has been adjusted many times since it debuted in 1947. [6] The Clock has become a universally recognized indicator of the world?s vulnerability to catastrophe from nuclear weapons, climate change, and new technologies emerging in other domains. [2] Anders Sandberg of the Future of Humanity Institute has stated that the “grab bag of threats” currently mixed together by the clock can induce paralysis. [5] In its two most recent annual announcements on the Clock, the Science and Security Board warned: “The probability of global catastrophe is very high, and the actions needed to reduce the risks of disaster must be taken very soon.” [2]

“We do not advise Americans that doomsday is near and that they can expect atomic bombs to start falling on their heads a month or year from now,” the Bulletin explains. [2] This is the clock’s closest approach to midnight since its inception, later matched in 2018. [5] The clock’s setting is decided without a specified starting time. [5]

The clock stood at 3 minutes to midnight in 2015, then advanced to two-and-a-half minutes last year, the first time the Bulletin had ever used a half-minute. [10] Jonathan Ernst / Reuters Last year, the bulletin pushed the clock from three minutes to midnight to two and a half because “of destabilizing comments and threats from America?s new commander in chief” and Trump’s blatant disregard of facts and science. [14] Last year the clock moved half a tick, from 3 minutes to 2.5 minutes before midnight; it has been in single digits since India and Pakistan staged back-to-back nuclear weapons tests in 1998. [12] We have progressed towards the apocalypse by five figurative minutes since the clock was first set at seven minutes to midnight in 1947, even though the hands were temporarily moved backwards under the more optimistic global outlook of the 1990s. [13] The clock is, as Sandberg puts it, “a form of probabilistic rhetoric,” but where did it come from? In 1947, a group of veteran Manhattan Project scientists, the Chicago Atomic Scientists, put a clock, with its minute hand set at seven minutes to midnight, on the cover of their journal, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. [10] The clock was set at 7 minutes to midnight in 1947, kind of accidentally–it was originally just a cover design for the Bulletin, and artist Martyl Langsdorf said this setting “looked good to my eye.” [15] The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 sent the clock reeling backward to 17 minutes ’til midnight — the most time we?ve had until annihilation since the project was conceived. [16] The last time the clock reached two minutes to midnight was in 1953, after the U.S. and the Soviet Union conducted back-to-back tests of hydrogen bombs. [11] The last time the clock stood this close to midnight was in 1953, when the U.S. and the Soviet Union started testing the first hydrogen bombs. [10]

What is significant is that, when we moved the clock to two minutes, it now has the value that?s equal to the closest its ever been to midnight in the last 71 years. [9] In 1991, with the end of the Cold War and the breakup of the Soviet Union, the clock eased back all the way to 17 minutes to midnight. [10] The graphical clock started at seven minutes to midnight, its two-dozen changes since marking the shifting tensions of the Cold War. [8] The clock is a measure of how worried the board members of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists are about a global catastrophe, based on the general state of things, and it’s their attempt to convey that concern to world leaders and the general public in the hope of prompting constructive change. [10] The clock is a symbolic threat assessment made by a panel of experts at the nonprofit Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. [11]

Each year the Bulletin decides whether to move the clock or leave it as-is. (Until 1973, the Bulletin?s editor set the clock.) [15] Each year, this group (the majority of which are men) meets to discuss the major threats facing humanity, and decide how to set the clock. [11] In such a climate, the clock, which was first set in 1947 is an ominous reminder of the global threat of nuclear war. [13] This is the nearest the clock has predicted that the world is to nuclear war since 1953, when it was set to 11.58pm in light of the U.S. pursuit of the hydrogen bomb. [13] The last time the clock was set at 11:58 p.m. was in 1953, after the U.S. and USSR successfully tested their first hydrogen bombs. [16]

Scientists do not set the clock based on individual events, such as a tweet from the president. [16] Because leaders and governments have proved ineffective at easing many threats, says Sivan Kartha of the Stockholm Environment Institute, moving the clock back will require the public to “compel their leaders to once again respect scientists, heed the facts, and make rational choices that move us further from the brink.” [12] The decision to move the time on the clock forward came after consulting the bulletin?s Board of Sponsors, which includes 16 Nobel Prize winners. [14] Since 1947, the Bulletin’s board members have adjusted the clock 23 times – sometimes forward, sometimes back. [10]

For Martin Pfeiffer, a graduate student studying nuclear anthropology at the University of New Mexico, the clock is a fitting metaphor given how the Cold War changed the way people thought about time. [11] The clock (which, by the way, does not exist physically–you can’t go visit it, which would probably be the most existentially distressing long weekend one could plan) is meant to remind us that global catastrophe has been just around the proverbial corner from the moment our species entered its nuclear age. [17]

This year, North Korea?s progressing nuclear weapons program, the unpredictable leadership of Donald Trump, and the disintegrating relationships between nuclear powers helped tick the clock 30 seconds closer to humanity?s extinction. [11] What the clock can provide is hope, because every year we point out that these problems are all solvable. [9]

“The various threats the Clock concerns itself with — nuclear war and climate change are the biggies — have completely different timescales.” [11] Starting with the June 1947 issue, the Bulletin featured a clock on its cover that was designed by artist Martyl Langsdorf. [11] Is there any more powerful reminder of human futility and helplessness than the inexorable march of time? The clock contributes to despair and fatalism, in the face of complex and urgent political problems, encouraging generalised panic. [13] “We?ve made the clear statement that we feel the world is getting more dangerous. ? We present the clock not so much as doom and gloom, but as an opportunity to get government and the public discussing the important issues,” adds physicist Lawrence Krauss of Arizona State University in Tempe. [12] We try and say what would be required to move the clock back. [9] It’s even more important to remember that every citizen, every consumer, and every voter has the power to help move the clock back. [10]

Imagine having a clock on your wall that sometimes ticks forward and sometimes ticks backward. [9]

The decision to change the clock’s time follows an extremely unsettling year in global politics. [13] Each announcement of the clock’s periodic changes is accompanied by a rash of news articles depicting mushroom clouds, stony-faced dictators, and parades of military hardware. [13]

Just maybe the clock’s keepers gain some small comfort, a sense of control over humanity’s collective fate, from the ritualistic moving of its terrible hands. [13]

A good analogy would be to think of humanity as walking on a tightrope above a deep canyon, if the canyon represents nuclear war, climate-driven catastrophe, or some other man-made doomsday scenario. [10]

According to the organization?s website, the Bulletin purposefully developed the Clock using apocalyptic imagery of “midnight” and the countdown to zero to demonstrate nuclear explosion in order to “convey threats to humanity and the planet.” [24] The time of two minutes “is as close as it has ever been to midnight in the 71-year history of the clock,” Lawrence Krauss, a physicist at Arizona State University and a Bulletin chair member, said during the briefing. [18] After the clock was introduced in 1947 — as a cover illustration for the BAS’ magazine, when it was set at 7 minutes to midnight — it has been reset 23 times, updated over the following decades depending on world events and threat levels. [23] In 1991, with the Cold War finally at an end and initiatives underway in the U.S. and Russia to reduce nuclear arsenals, the clock made its biggest jump backward yet, landing at 17 minutes to midnight. [23] The decade closed with the clock at a hopeful 10 minutes to midnight in 1969, after global leaders signed a treaty in 1968 to collaborate in the development of nuclear power without producing new nuclear weapons. [23] The clock, which exists to show how close humanity is to annihilation, is now uncomfortably sitting at “two minutes to midnight,” matching the closest the it has ever come to the zero hour in its entire 71-years of existence. [26] A panel of experts on Thursday changed the clock to two minutes to midnight, a forward movement of 30 seconds. [18] In an op-ed penned for the Washington Post last year, when the clock was moved to 2.30 minutes to midnight, Lawrence M. Krauss and retired Navy Rear Adm. [26] The clock may yet roll back from the 2-minute mark; after all, it did in 1960, when BAS reset it to 7 minutes to midnight. [23] At the time, this was the closest the clock had come to midnight in over 60 years. [23] The clock has been trending closer to midnight over the last 10 years. [25] Even though that threat has diminished markedly since the fall of the Berlin Wall, the clock has remained at quite close to midnight. [20]

In January, two scientists on the Board, theoretical physicist Lawrence M. Krauss and Astrophysicist Robert Rosner, wrote a Washington Post op-ed on behalf of the Bulletin, attributing the Clock hand?s positioning directly to Trump?s denial of climate change and attitude toward global warming. [24] The Bulletin began publicly adjusting the clock in 1947 to reflect the state of dire threats to the world, primarily to address the tense state of US-Soviet relations and the risk for global nuclear war. [18] “We are very concerned with the unpredictability of the United States and how it’s thinking of its nuclear weapons,” Rachel Bronson, the president and CEO of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, which created the clock, told NPR. [22] With the latest change to the Clock, the Bulletin released a statement, saying, “The year just past proved perilous and chaotic, a year in which many of the risks foreshadowed in our last Clock statement came into full relief. [24] Last year, the Bulletin also moved the clock forward 30 seconds. [19] “The danger of nuclear conflagration is not the only reason the clock has been moved forward, as my colleagues have described. [23] The panel also noted the worrisome state of nuclear programs and security risks in Pakistan, India, Russia, and North Korea in its decision to move the clock forward, as well as Trump’s lack of support for a deal to monitor Iran’s nuclear program. [18]

After hearing impassioned debates between scientists over the consequences of having developed the Bomb, Martyl designed the symbolic Clock that ticks only to “midnight” to represent the end of the world as we know it. [24] The only other time the clock was set so close to catastrophe in its 71-year history was in 1953, after the U.S. and the Soviet Union detonated their first thermonuclear bombs. [27] When the clock was first introduced, in 1947, it was set at seven minutes to midnight because, according to the artist who created it, that setting “looked good to my eye.” [20] Only once before has the Clock edged this close to midnight. [24] The last time the clock showed humanity this close to total and utter annihilation was 1953, shortly after the U.S. decided to pursue the hydrogen bomb, a weapon far more powerful than any atomic bomb, according to the Bulletin’s timeline. [22] The Bulletin recently started to factor in climate change, harmful chemical or biological agents and emerging technologies when determining how much the clock has moved. [25] Since the closing of the Cold War in 1991, the clock has come to represent other major threats such as climate change, artificial intelligence, and cyberwarfare. [18] The clock, established at the start of the Cold War in 1945, has become a universally recognized metaphor, indicating the world’s vulnerability to catastrophe from nuclear weapons, climate change and new technologies. [22] During the Cold War, when the U.S. and USSR had tens of thousands of nuclear weapons, one could argue that the clock served as a useful, if imperfect, tool for reminding the public about the possibility of nuclear war — and preventing such an event from occurring. [20] The metaphorical clock skipped 30 seconds ahead in 2018 due to “reckless language” from world leaders, North Korea’s advancing nuclear weapons program, tensions between the U.S. and Russia, devastating natural disasters, among other reasons. [25]

“But the factors that have really moved the clock have always been nuclear from the beginning. [25] Developed in 1947, the Clock concept was created by artist Martyl Langsdorf for the June cover of the Bulletin journal, its first issue to be published as a magazine as opposed to its usual newsletter. [24] “Never before has the Bulletin decided to advance the Clock largely because of the statements of a single person. [24] The panel at the Bulletin also said 2017’s environmental disasters contributed to the moving of the clock – specifically the devastating wildfires in the U.S., powerful hurricanes, extreme heat waves and record-breaking shrinking Arctic ice caps. [25]

“As of today, it is two minutes to midnight,” Rachel Bronson, the president and CEO of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, which sets the clock’s time, said during a press briefing. [18] This morning, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists (BAS) — an organization of science and policy experts who assess human scientific advancement and risk — revealed the clock’s new “time,” with the hands now standing at 2 minutes to midnight. [23]

The Bulletin’s science and security board consults with its board of sponsors, which includes 15 Nobel laureates, each year to decide whether to adjust the clock or leave it unchanged. [19] It is not any one of those factors, but a combination of all of them — and the weakening of public faith in knowledgeable expert voices — that prompted the change to the clock, Lawrence Krauss, chair of the BAS Board of Sponsors and director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University, told reporters. [23] They consult with colleagues and with the BAS’ Board of Sponsors, which includes 15 Nobel laureates, when making decisions about changes to the clock. [23]

The last time the clock was in this position was when the United States and the Soviet Union performed test detonations of hydrogen bombs. [26] Today (Jan. 25), the clock has crept even closer to the zero hour. [23]  “Moving the clock 30 seconds conveyed the message they were trying to send: this doesn’t bode well.” [25] The clock is not only overstating the potential for nuclear war, but misinforming “real people” about the risks they actually face. [20] From 2015 to 2018, the clock has dropped from 3 minutes to 2 minutes. [25] As 2018 begins with the clock’s hands 2 minutes from midnight, the urgency for addressing these issues is arguably greater than ever before. [23] According to the Bulletin, an increasingly fractured response to climate change is the last crucial factor that is pushing the clock’s hand towards the end of humanity. [26]

Rachel Bronson, the president and CEO of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists argued that the “power of the Doomsday Clock. gives us a way to talk about these enormously complicated issues in a way that real people can have real conversations.” [20]

They meet twice annually to confer about events of global importance and how they might affect the clock’s status. [23] Several factors contributed to the clock’s advancement, including President Donald Trump’s rhetoric on nuclear weapons and his administration’s policy positions. [18]

At two minutes to midnight, the clock is at its closest to catastrophe since 1953, due to dangers of a nuclear holocaust from North Korea’s weapons program, U.S. Russian entanglements, South China Sea tensions, and other factors, the Chicago-based group said in a statement. [44] The closer the clock is to midnight, the greater the perceived existential dangers are to the planet: nuclear disaster, climate change, a global pandemic, malevolent artificial intelligences and/or killer nanorobots. [32]

The last time the clock was at two minutes to midnight – where midnight represents global catastrophe – was during the Cold War years, when the United States and the Soviet Union were testing hydrogen bombs, 65 years ago. [34] The Clock represents the hypothetical global catastrophe as “midnight” and The Bulletin’s opinion on how close the world is to a global catastrophe as a number of “minutes” to midnight. [30]

When the clock was created in 1947, it was set at 7 minutes to midnight. [44] On January 26, 2017, the clock was set ahead another 30 seconds, with the Bulletin stating that, “Over the course of 2016, the global security landscape darkened as the international community failed to come effectively to grips with humanity?s most pressing existential threats, nuclear weapons, and climate change.” [35] The group set the clock ahead 30 seconds for 2018 because in the past year, according to a statement, “world leaders failed to respond effectively to the looming threats of nuclear war and climate change, making the world security situation more dangerous than it was a year ago–and as dangerous as it has been since World War II.” [35] Maintained since 1947 by the members of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ Science and Security Board, the Clock represents an analogy for the threat of global nuclear war. [30] The Bulletin’s Science and Security board meet twice a year to “discuss events” and decide if they’re going to change the clock, and they’ve opted to do so 22 times since the clock was invented in 1947. [30]

This year, the Board cited “the failure of world leaders to address the largest threats to humanity’s future”especially nuclear weapons and climate changeas the reason to move the clock forward. [31] The clock was moved forward by 30 seconds on Thursday by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists because of mounting concern over nuclear war and climate change. [34] Richard Somerville, a board member at the Bulletin, told Al Jazeera he hopes re-setting the clock will raise awareness of the risks of nuclear warfare and climate change. [34]

The nuclear scientists created the clock to warn the United States of the nuclear dangers it faced. [33] If some nuclear “bad” thing happened or if the United States didn?t lead the world to eliminate nuclear weapons, the clock would tick toward midnight, at which time the world would face Armageddon. [33] In 2016, the clock remained unmoved, its hands staying at three minutes to midnight. [44] The 30-second move in 2017 marked the first time the group had set the clock ahead less than a full minute. [35] A political note of interest: Democratic presidents cumulatively moved the clock 16 seconds closer to doom, while Republican administrations actually moved the clock 11 seconds away from doom, with the clock moving over 71 years from seven to two minutes to Armageddon. [33] This is also the closest the clock has ever gotten to midnight: in over seven decades of chaos and change, it has never ticked over to 11:59. [31] Martyl set the original Clock at seven minutes to midnight because, she said, “it looked good to my eye.” [30]

The clock lost two minutes in 2007 thanks to North Korea’s nuke tests and the uncertainty of Iran’s nuclear actions. [35] By 1953, the clock had lost five minutes, putting the time at 11:58. [35] She sketched a clock to suggest that we didn’t have much time left to get atomic weapons under control. [30]

Unchecked dangers linked to climate change were another factor scientists cited for moving the clock forward. [44] “We hope this resetting of the clock will be interpreted exactly as it is meant–as an urgent warning of global danger,” said Robert Rosner, the William E. Wrather Distinguished Service Professor in Astronomy & Astrophysics and Physics at the University of Chicago, who chairs the Bulletin?s science and security board. [29] It?s time to stop the clock and start listening to the science that?s supposed to inform it. [28] The 1962 Cuban missile crisis and the Soviets building the Berlin Wall were ignored and did not affect the time on the clock. [33] The three treaties equaled five minutes gained on the clock, putting us back at 11:48. [35] This resulted in a loss of two minutes; the clock read 11:53. [35]

For 70 years a group of people have been fiddling with a meaningless “clock” to guess how close we are to annihilating ourselves. [30] With this sort of record, perhaps clocks are better off simply telling the time. [33] I actually don’t believe that there are many people who suddenly start caring about nuclear war and climate change because of a fake clock, but whatever. [30] Decisions about changing the clock were made by one guy up until 1973, and are now made by the magazine’s board. [30] The clock was at 11:48 thanks to increased studies and scientific understanding of nuclear weapons. [35] Last year the clock’s hands were pushed forward 30 seconds to their second closest point to midnight – two minutes and 30 seconds – after Trump’s statements regarding the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the prospect of actually using them. [44] Its Science and Security Board decides on the clock’s hands in consultation with its Board of Sponsors, which includes 15 Nobel laureates. [44]

The very name “Doomsday Clock”–and its ongoing association with nuclear apocalypse–defies nuance. [28] Most recently, late last month it was moved 30 seconds closer to Doomsday. [33]

RANKED SELECTED SOURCES(44 source documents arranged by frequency of occurrence in the above report)

1. (20) Armageddon Update: Doomsday Clock Stands at 2 Minutes to Midnight

2. (19) 2018 Doomsday Clock Statement – Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

3. (19) Nuclear ‘doomsday clock’ better off if it just stopped ticking entirely | TheHill

4. (18) Doomsday Clock – Wikipedia

5. (14) Doomsday Clock ticks forward due to nuclear war risks, climate change – Business Insider

6. (14) Doomsday clock ticks closer to midnight, now two minutes away

7. (13) What is the Doomsday Clock? | Fox News

8. (12) How the Doomsday Clock Could Help Trigger the Armageddon It Warns of – Scientific American

9. (12) Everything You Need to Know About the Doomsday Clock | Teen Vogue

10. (11) What Is The Doomsday Clock?

11. (11) The Doomsday Clock is the gimmick we need to think about nuclear tensions – The Verge

12. (11) 11 Times the Doomsday Clock Time Has Been Adjusted | Mental Floss

13. (10) Stop the (Doomsday) clock – The Boston Globe

14. (10) The Doomsday Clock Is Stupid :: Politics :: Features :: Doomsday Clock :: Paste

15. (9) Doomsday Clock Is Set at 2 Minutes to Midnight, Closest Since 1950s – The New York Times

16. (7) The “Doomsday Clock” Is Now Set at “Two Minutes to Midnight” – Futurism

17. (7) What Even Is The Doomsday Clock? | The New Republic

18. (6) Doomsday Clock 2018: What to Know About the New Time | Time

19. (6) Scientists? Doomsday Clock reaches 2 minutes to midnight, closest ever | Science | AAAS

20. (6) Doomsday Clock board says we’re the closest to annihilation since 1953

21. (6) Nuclear fears push Doomsday Clock closer to midnight | News | Al Jazeera

22. (6) ‘Doomsday Clock’ closest to midnight since Cold War over nuclear threat | Reuters

23. (5) Doomsday Clock is closest to midnight in its history

24. (5) Doomsday Clock Moves Closer To Midnight, We’re 2 Minutes From World Annihilation : The Two-Way : NPR

25. (5) What the Doomsday Clock doesn?t tell us

26. (5) The ‘Doomsday Clock’ Is Now as Close to Midnight as It’s Ever Been – Atlas Obscura

27. (5) Scientists moved the Doomsday Clock — what does that mean? – HelloGiggles

28. (4) Doomsday Clock is now just two minutes from midnight

29. (4) https://lifehacker.com/how-the-doomsday-clock-works-1822424761

30. (4) Keepers of The Doomsday Clock Say We’re Now Only 2 Minutes to Midnight

31. (4) Doomsday Clock moves its closest to midnight since height of Cold War

32. (4) The Doomsday Clock People Are Freaking Me Out – Motherboard

33. (4) Doomsday Clock Tracks Humanity’s Many Movements Toward Oblivion | Wisconsin Public Radio

34. (4) Doomsday Clock – Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

35. (4) The Doomsday Clock Ticks Closer to Midnight Over Nuclear War Fears | WIRED

36. (3) What the heck is the Doomsday Clock, and why did it just tick? | Popular Science

37. (3) The Doomsday Clock Would Like You To Be Concerned | FiveThirtyEight

38. (3) Rewinding the Doomsday Clock – Future of Life Institute

39. (3) Timeline – Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

40. (3) How Close to Midnight? Why Scientists Moved the Doomsday Clock in 2018 – The Atlantic

41. (2) ‘Doomsday Clock’ ticked forward 30 seconds to 2 minutes to midnight | World news | The Guardian

42. (2) Doomsday Clock: It’s 2 minutes to midnight – Axios

43. (1) The Doomsday Clock Was Just Updated, and It Hasn’t Been This Bad Since Eisenhower Mother Jones

44. (1) The Doomsday Clock is now at two minutes to midnight thanks to Donald Trump and Kim Jong-Un — Quartz